A Mahj subscription for an exceptional set of drawings on the Dreyfus Affair

    A Mahj subscription for an exceptional set of drawings on the Dreyfus Affair

    20/12/20 Acquisition and subscription – Paris, Museum of Art and History of Judaism The Museum of Art and History of Judaism is launching a subscription for a set of more than two hundred drawings that it pre-empted during the sale organized by SVV Ivoire Nantes on Tuesday, December 8. Produced by Maurice Feuillet during the trials of Émile Zola and Alfred Dreyfus in Paris in 1898 and in Rennes in 1899, these audience sketches join in its collections an important collection dedicated to the Dreyfus affair made up of more than 3,350 coins donated by the captain’s descendants. A most remarkable set but until then essentially made up of archives which, with the exception of a few newspapers and engravings and less than twenty caricatures by Jean-Louis Forain and Jules Grandjouan, offered very few representations of the case. A gap now filled by the more than two hundred portraits, courtroom scenes and public views brilliantly pre-empted, which will take place, by rotation, in the section dedicated to the Dreyfus affair that the project to redesign the permanent route plans to expand widely. Necessary, the acquisition that could not be budgeted was made from the museum’s working capital, an amount of € 49,700 (with costs) for which a public subscription, supplemented by a grant from FRAM, is now launched. . Donations can be made online or by mail by downloading a support bulletin through the Pro mahJ Foundation.

    1. Maurice Feuillet (1873 – 1968)

    Alfred Dreyfus at trial, August 12, 1899

    Black chalk with highlights

    white gouache – 35.2 x 22.8 cm

    Paris, Mahj

    Photo: SVV Ivoire Nantes

    See the image in his page

    A Mahj subscription for an exceptional set of drawings on the Dreyfus Affair

    2. Maurice Feuillet (1873 – 1968)

    Zola at trial

    Black stone – 31.7 x 24 cm

    Paris, Mahj

    Photo: SVV Ivoire Nantes

    See the image in his page

    Fifty-seven of the sixty-one lots offered for sale were taken by the …

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