Credited for the missed meeting Trump, the community K-pop politise

Créditée pour le raté de la réunion de Trump, la communauté K-pop se politise

NEW YORK | Celebrated on the social networks for having sabotaged the recent meeting of Donald Trump, the community of fans of K-pop asserts itself more and more as an activist, far from the smooth image of this Korean music popular.

#rallyfail meeting (missed), #crowdfail (crowd absent): they are in the hundreds, since Saturday, to celebrate on the social network TikTok in what they present as a transaction that is coordinated to disrupt the meeting of campaign of Donald Trump in Tulsa (Tulsa, Oklahoma).

A few days before the event, campaign director of the head of State, Brad Parscale, had announced that over one million people had requested tickets, predicting a triumph.

Finally, the images were shown to the room which greeted the president in part empty, while Donald Trump was speaking to his supporters, the fire department of Tulsa felt the same that only 6200 spectators were presented.

The very active community of fans of K-pop, the musical movement to the worldwide popularity, had relayed the call on TikTok to book seats for this meeting with the firm intention not to go there.

Today, it claims a victory, even if it is very difficult to determine in what this campaign was actually private Donald Trump of a room full.

“I booked two tickets, but I had to go walk my fish”, has published Chris on TikTok. “Sorry, I got caught. I had to really put my ice cubes by size,” was the amused Matthew Kalik. “It took me all day.”

Neither a campaign team nor Donald Trump himself did not mention TikTok or the K-pop after this meeting in half-tint, but the young mp democratic socialist Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez has paid tribute to the movement: “You just make it MOVE by teens of TikTok”, she tweeted to the president.

“Allies of the K-pop, we recognize and appreciate your contribution in the struggle for justice,” said the woman of 30 years, a rising figure on the left american.

“Change things”

Built on a group of young Korean-inspired boy band, created from scratch by music labels, K-pop is, a priori, a musical movement without any harshness, the opposite of any form of political commitment.

But a long time ago that the community of admirers, as master of the social networks is very high, is at the service of causes, mainly of works of charity.

A first decisive turn was made with the movement born after the death of George Floyd, supported by a good part of the army K-pop.

At the beginning of June, the group BTS, a banner for the movement, with its 26 million followers on Twitter, has tweeted his support to the demonstrators and expressed its solidarity with the movement Black Lives Matter.

“Fans of K-pop are, in general, open-minded people, interested in the issues of society,” explains CedarBough Saeji, a specialist in asian culture and a professor at the university of Indiana.

“And the United States”, she adds, “the K-pop is very supported by the people of colour [as well as] by the people who identify as LGBTQ.”

After his message, the BTS has given millions of dollars to Black Lives Matter. In a few hours, a association rise by admirers, One In an ARMY, then met the same sum.

“The songs of BTS have a role in that they help us to have confidence in us, to be kind to others, we support each other”, says Dawnica Nadora, volunteer of One In an ARMY.

The community K-pop has several times taken the initiative in line these past few weeks, in particular to counter an attempt of the conservatives to make viral the hashtag #WhiteLivesMatter (the life of the White account).

In a few hours, hundreds of messages containing this hashtag have been posted by fans, but with content denouncing racism and promoting K-pop.

Thus, they have drowned out the messages that are hostile to Black Lives Matter in a deluge of their own production.

“If they have the feeling that they can change things,” says CedarBough Saeji, the eyes turned to the presidential election of November, “they will convince themselves that voting is used to something”.

Share Button