Knives on planes: concern among pilots and flight attendants

Photo: Jacques Nadeau Le Devoir
Earlier this week, the union representing 10,000 flight attendants wrote a letter to the federal minister of Transport requiring him to take a step back.

After the flight attendants, it is the turn of the Air Canada pilots to worry about the decision of Ottawa, allowing the blades to six inches or less on board aircraft.

 

“The Association of pilots of Air Canada believes that the previous ban on knives in the cabin was a safety measure that is prudent and responsible, wrote in an email to Duty, the spokeswoman Kym Robertson. It is important to remember that drivers are still very much affected by the events that have led to their prohibition. “

 

Transport Canada announced two weeks ago that the small blades would be accepted in the cabin from Monday, which includes the small kirpans by sikhs, but excludes the razor blades and fold-out blades (X-acto).

 

Ms. Robertson acknowledged that this new rule aligns ” with most other jurisdictions “, but adds that the new rules ” are now more aligned with those of the United States, which may create confusion and complications for travellers cross-border “.

 

Already authorized

 

The rule will apply to all flights departing from Canada, except those in the United States.

 

The small knives are already allowed to board flights arriving in Canada if they come from jurisdictions that allow them, such as Great Britain, France, Germany, Australia, or even Russia.

 

Earlier this week, the union representing 10,000 flight attendants working for Air Canada, Air Transat, Sunwing, CanJet, Cathay Pacific and First Air has written a letter to the federal minister of Transport requiring him to take a step back.

 

This change, he wrote, ” has raised concerns among our members “.

 

“We believe that this rake is too wide and exposes our members and the travelling public at a great risk,” writes Marie-Hélène Major, the secretary-treasurer of the airline division of the canadian Union of the public service. It has not been possible to obtain an interview.

 

The letter does not concern, however, not of kirpans by sikhs, but rather, karambits, small knives combat blade curved from Indonesia.

 

The Bloc québécois, who first raised this issue in the House of commons, believes that the federal government has adopted this change in order to satisfy the sikh community. The lobby of the sikh asked for several years already in Canada to adopt the rules in force elsewhere in the world.

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