Local flavors

Local flavors

A multitude of substitutions are possible for certain foods from afar or “anonymous”, which are sometimes used in automatic mode.

Using the table below and the many sourcing tips shared in Part 1, you can tackle all the recipes in this book by telling yourself that it is possible to find all of the locally sourced and artisanal ingredients. , except salt, pepper, baking powder (baking powder) and baking soda.

Wild picking

The recipes are also punctuated with wild-picked produce and herbs, usually “optional”, so you can prepare them even when you don't have them on hand. Their presence here will nevertheless give you ideas for adding them to the menu, if you feel like it. This is a great way – less complicated than you might think – to showcase the best that our territory has to offer!

Anonymous or traveling foods

  • Examples of foods from a farm, a picker or a local artisan

Capers

  • Daisy buds or immature elderberries *

Top brand wheat and oat flour

  • Wheat and oat flour from local farms. Other local grains and flour (spelled, buckwheat, rye, naked oats …)

Cheeses of all types

  • Dozens of farm cheesemakers offer their creations, which are easy to find and can replace the various imported cheeses, from cow, goat or sheep, from fresh pasta such as mozzarella to hard pasta. Some also offer plain farmhouse yogurt made with milk from their herd, without added imported sugar.

Chia seeds

  • Linseed or camelina seeds

Imported pumpkin seeds

  • The seeds of your squash and pumpkins, whole roasted or bare seed varieties, or variants to replace imported nuts, on the next page.

Olive oil

  • Sunflower, camelina, hemp, flax, canola or cranberry seed oils

Lemon juice, lime juice (lime)

  • Apple cider vinegar, maple vinegar and other artisanal vinegars from here. Apple or grape verjuice (from pressing grapes or unripe apples)
  • Sauerkraut can also be used to add acidity, depending on recipes.

Nuts, hazelnuts, pistachios, almonds, cashews

  • Some producers offer black walnut or butternut nuts, hazelnuts and other Nordic nuts; if you find any, take advantage! As the quantities offered are still modest, it is possible to replace imported nuts with Canadian sunflower seeds in several recipes.

Chickpeas and chickpea flour

  • Several legumes, including chickpeas, are grown in Canada. If you want to get closer to what is happening in Quebec and that you can find in eat close mode, yellow peas and yellow pea flour are to be tried. Other dry legumes come from nearby farms, such as beluga lentils and various beans, for example.

Pepper

  • Ground dune pepper *, preferably added at the end of cooking

Imported rice, quinoa, couscous

  • Bare oats, barley, local cauliflower couscous

Commercial hot sauces, Espelette pepper

  • Artisanal hot sauces made with local chili peppers, or local dried peppers like Gorria chili

Sugar, brown sugar, molasses, corn syrup

  • Maple sugar or syrup, honey, sometimes jam

Vanilla

  • Melilot *

Balsamic vinegar

  • Birch syrup *

White vinegar, imported wine vinegar

  • Apple cider vinegar, maple vinegar and other artisanal vinegars from here. Apple or grape verjuice
  • Sauerkraut can also be used to add acidity, depending on recipes.
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