Omar Khadr: the american lawyers are gunning down their cards

Photo: Colin Perkel The canadian Press
The appellants submit that no court — whether in Canada or in the United States — has concluded that the confessions of the young man had been obtained under duress.

Toronto — Omar Khadr cannot evade a civil judgment in denying today the admissions made in 2010 before a military commission at Guantanamo bay, consider the lawyers of the widow of an american military killed in Afghanistan.

 

In their written argument, lawyers for Tabitha Speer, widow of special Forces soldier Chris Speer, argue that canadian courts should admit into the state a joint statement of facts signed by the parties to the war crimes trial of a young Canadian, regardless of whether he lied under oath admitting he had thrown the grenade deadly.

 

The appellants submit that no court — whether in Canada or in the United States — has concluded that the confessions of the young man had been obtained under duress. The lawyers indicate that Mr. Khadr has already benefited from his confession in obtaining a reduced sentence and the possibility of being held in Canada.

 

The attorneys argue also that it is not relevant here to recall how the us military had treated Mr. Khadr, aged 15 years of age at the time of his arrest in Afghanistan in July 2002.

 

The teen was then held in prison in Guantanamo bay, where he has been ill-treated and deprived of their fundamental rights, have entered into the canadian courts.

 

The applicants americans ask the Court of queen’s bench of Alberta to enforce the judgment of a civil court of Utah, which was ordered in June 2015 to Omar Khadr to pay damages of $134 million US) to the widow of the soldier Speer and the ex-soldier Layne Morris. Chris Speer was killed in the american offensive against insurgents.

 

The young Omar Khadr was seriously wounded during the same operation.

 

In exchange for eight years of imprisonment, and the possibility of serving the remainder of his sentence in Canada, Omar Khadr, a Toronto native, was accepted in 2010 to recognize its responsibility, in front of a court largely discredited in the world. It was later argued that the confession detailed, enrolled in a joint statement of facts prepared by the us military prosecutors, were the only way for him to return to Canada.

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