Researchers manage to transplant coral

Photo: William West Archives Agence France-Presse
Researchers from the australian University, Southern Cross were collected at the end of 2016 of large quantities of eggs and sperm from corals at Heron Island, off the eastern coast.

Sydney — scientists were able to grow from the coral of the Great Barrier reef in Australia, and to transplant it in another area of this jewel of the world heritage, a project that gives them the hope to restore the damaged ecosystems around the world.

 

Researchers from the australian university, Southern Cross, who have made public their study Sunday, have collected by the end of 2016 of large quantities of eggs and sperm from corals at Heron Island, off the eastern coast.

 

They have produced massive quantities of larvae, which they then transplanted into damaged areas of the Great Barrier reef, which is threatened by the warming climate.

 

Eight months later, the scientists found that the coral juvenile had survived and grown.

 

“The success of this new research applies not only to the Great Barrier reef, it potentially has an international relevance,” said Peter Harrison, director of research.

 

“It shows that we can restore and repair of the populations, coral damaged, in places where the natural production of larvae has been compromised. “

 

This technique is different from the method used currently known as the ” gardening coral “, which is to break off branches of coral healthy to reimplant on reefs, in the hope that they will grow back, or the breeding of coral in nurseries, ” said Mr. Harrison.

 

The method had been tested previously with success in the Philippines on a reef severely damaged by dynamite fishing.

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